A research team led by Sushil Kumar of Lehigh University, Penn, USA, has devised an “antenna feedback” scheme that reportedly can provide single-mode operation and strong, highly directional far-field coupling in surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) lasers, bringing them “closer to practical applications” Read more

Read More

While advances in laser technology have driven the unprecedented development of optical coatings, the optical and mechanical properties of coatings must continue to evolve for successful deployment of next-generation high-power, ultrafast, and spaceborne laser systems. Read more

Read More

Live 3-D imaging is one of the hottest topics in optics today, transforming medical imaging capabilities and delivering the immersive experience behind augmented and virtual reality. During The Optical Society’s Light the Future centennial program in Heidelberg, Germany on 26 July, Dr. Joseph Izatt of Duke University and Microsoft’s Bernard Kress gave an insider’s look [..]

Read More

For medics on the battlefield and doctors in remote or developing parts of the world, getting rapid access to the drugs needed to treat patients can be challenging. Biopharmaceutical drugs, which are used in a wide range of therapies including vaccines and treatments for diabetes and cancer, are typically produced in large, centralized fermentation plants. [..]

Read More

Optical coherence tomography (OCT), adaptive optics and other technologies have opened up a world of possibilities for imaging the retina, right down to the photoreceptor cells (rods and cones) that are the gateway to vision. But the equipment for cellular-resolution imaging is bulky, heavy and inconvenient, making it all but useless for addressing one key [..]

Read More

MIT researchers have developed a new technique for imaging brain tissue at multiple scales, allowing them to peer at molecules within cells or take a wider view of the long-range connections between neurons. This technique, known as magnified analysis of proteome (MAP), should help scientists in their ongoing efforts to chart the connectivity and functions [..]

Read More

Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue. A team led by Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos, Chair for Biological Imaging at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Director [..]

Read More

The primary source of infrared radiation is heat — the radiation produced by the thermal motion of charged particles in matter, including the motion of the atoms and molecules in an object. The higher the temperature of an object, the more its atoms and molecules vibrate, rotate, and twist through their vibrational modes, the more [..]

Read More

Interferometry is a powerful methodology that is used widely for metrology measurements of telescope optics. It can be difficult or nearly impossible, however, to measure large convex optics (that do not have a real focal point), or complex-shaped optics, with an interferometer. Furthermore, interferometers require a large amount of space (comparable to the radius of [..]

Read More

Researchers from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill) and North Carolina State University (NC State; Raleigh, NC) built on an existing technology — two-photon microscopy — to allow neuroscientists to capture images of the brain almost 10 times larger than previously possible, therefore helping them to better understand the behavior of [..]

Read More

To diagnose and assess diseases such as cancer, physicians typically make decisions based on averaged measurements taken from thousands of cells obtained in tissue biopsies. This approach works perfectly for some diseases, but when searching for one ‘bad apple’ amongst thousands of healthy neighbors, or if a disease mutates and changes as it grows, vital [..]

Read More

Diabetes is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases, affecting approximately 9% of the global population. Because diabetes can cause many complications that dramatically increase the risk of death, such as cardiovascular, kidney, and neurological diseases, precise monitoring and continuous treatment are greatly needed. Read more

Read More

Cells contain thousands of messenger RNA molecules, which carry copies of DNA’s genetic instructions to the rest of the cell. MIT engineers have now developed a way to visualize these molecules in higher resolution than previously possible in intact tissues, allowing researchers to precisely map the location of RNA throughout cells. Read more

Read More

Wearable sensors make up one of the fastest-growing technology markets. According to market research firm International Data Corporation, total global shipment volumes of wearables reached 19.7 million units in 1Q16, an increase of 67.2 percent from the 11.8 million units shipped in 1Q15. Wearable devices are rapidly advancing in terms of technology, functionality and size, [..]

Read More

By using a light-sheet microscopy method, researchers at North Carolina State University discovered that therapeutic stem cells exit the bloodstream in a different manner than previously understood. This process, dubbed angiopellosis by the researchers, has implications for improving our understanding of not only intravenous stem cell therapies, but also metastatic cancers. Read more

Read More

Researchers at the Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands) and collaborators developed a tumor-specific fluorescent agent and imaging system that could guide surgeons in real time to remove additional tumors in ovarian cancer patients that were not visible without fluorescence or could not be felt during surgery. Read more

Read More

A camera technology dubbed Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) now works in unison with CCD and CMOS camera sensors to extract previously unseen images. The CCD sensor camera — a technology that earned its inventors a Nobel Prize in 2009 — and CMOS sensor camera, and dominate imaging.. Read more

Read More