Optical microscopy experts at Colorado State University are once again pushing the envelope of biological imaging. Jeffrey Field, a research scientist in electrical engineering and director of CSU’s Microscope Imaging Network, has designed and built a fluorescence-detection microscope that combines three-dimensional and high-resolution image processing that’s also faster than comparable techniques. Read more

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Detection of explosives (eg. in the field, baggage, or transit systems) has become an intense field of research over the last 15 years. Several physical (such as ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and active neutron interrogation) and chemical (including calorimetry, fluorescence quenching, and electro-chemistry) techniques have been investigated as suitable detection mechanisms, and wide-ranging efforts [..]

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MIT researchers have developed a technique for recovering visual information from light that has scattered because of interactions with the environment — such as passing through human tissue. The technique could lead to medical-imaging systems that use visible light, which carries much more information than X-rays or ultrasound waves, or to computer vision systems that [..]

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Traditionally, the study of diseases at the molecular level has required scientists to extract cells and tissues from animal models and then look for clues in the samples that can determine the mechanisms underlying the disease and driving its progression. According to Chris B. Schaffer, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Cornell University, New York, [..]

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Thermal Noise Imaging

Imagine standing in a dark room in which a single, glowing ball is bouncing around. The ball avoids a region in the center of the room. Over time, you might conclude that an object sits in that region, even though you cannot see it. That thought experiment illustrates thermal-noise imaging, a technique that a team [..]

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A research team from the United States and China has demonstrated a three-lens fluorescence microscopy method, paired with a computational algorithm, that uses “lost” light from biological specimens to produce high-resolution 3-D images. Read more

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It is hard to overestimate the impact fluorescence imaging has had on life sciences. Fluorescence has advanced the field dramatically, and has become the basis for numerous bioimaging approaches and applications. Optical filtering provides a major source of enhancement for fluorescence techniques —enabling image contrast maximization, maintenance of image quality, and delivery of better outcomes. [..]

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Researchers from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill (UNC-Chapel Hill) and North Carolina State University (NC State; Raleigh, NC) built on an existing technology — two-photon microscopy — to allow neuroscientists to capture images of the brain almost 10 times larger than previously possible, therefore helping them to better understand the behavior of [..]

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